Dental Crown

A crown (or cap) is a covering that encases the entire tooth surface restoring it to its original shape and size. 

A crown protects and strengthens tooth structure that cannot be restored with fillings or other types of restorations.

 

Although there are several types of crowns, porcelain (tooth colored crown) are the most popular. They are highly durable and will last many years, but like most dental restorations, they may eventually need to be replaced.

Dental Crown

Porcelain crowns are made to match the shape, size, and color or your teeth giving you a natural, long-lasting beautiful smile.

Reasons for crowns:

  • Broken or fractured teeth.
  • Cosmetic enhancement.
  • Decayed teeth.
  • Fractured fillings.
  • Large fillings.
  • Tooth has a root canal.

 

What does getting a crown involve?

A crown procedure requires two appointments. 

On the first appointment, while the tooth is numb, I will prepare the tooth by removing all decay and if needed building the tooth back up while shaping its surface for a properly fitting crown.  Then either a  highly accurate impression  or an intra oral scan of the prepped tooth is taken which will be sent out  and used to create the custom crown. This process will usually take two weeks and meanwhile  a temporary crown is fabricated and placed on the prepped tooth. 

The care of the temporary crown is very important. You have to make sure not to eat anything hard or sticky and maintain very good hygiene. Having sensitivity to bite and temperature is pretty normal as long as it is not keeping you up at night. If at any time you feel like you are swollen or if your bite is off call the office and we will get you right in.

At your second appointment, your temporary crown will be removed, the tooth will be cleaned, and your new crown will be carefully placed to ensure that the spacing and bite are accurate. This appointment might or might not need anesthetic depending on the patient. 

There are a few excellent options for the type of materials that we use for crowns. The most popular are zirconium, emax, all porcelain, porcelain fused to metal or full gold crown. They each have pros and cons. My favorite and most common used material is zirconium, which is what I have in my own mouth, however sometimes I will recommend a different material depending on your case. I will discuss the material and reasoning with you at the consult appointment.

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